Female song is structurally different from male song in Orchard Orioles, a temperate-breeding songbird with delayed plumage maturation
El canto de las hembras es estructuralmente diferente que el canto de los machos en Icterus spurius, un ave cantora que se reproduce en zonas templadas con maduración tardía del plumaje

Michelle J. Moyer, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Evangeline M. Rose, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park
D'Juan A. Moreland, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Aiman Raza, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Sean M. Brown, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Alexis L. Scarselletta, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Bernard Lohr, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Karan J. Odom, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park
Kevin E. Omland, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/JFO-00073-930103

Full Text: HTML   
Download Citation


Abstract

Female birds in many temperate species are thought to sing reduced or quieter songs and appear to sing less often than their male counterparts. Therefore, female song may be easily overlooked. Increasingly, researchers are recording female song in well-studied species previously assumed to have little or no female song. In this study, we document the extensive use of female song in Orchard Orioles (Icterus spurius), a species with delayed plumage maturation where female song had not been well-documented. Based on observations of females singing in the early breeding season, we hypothesized that female song may function for mate attraction. To formally investigate whether females sing specifically early in the season, we assessed singing rates of each sex throughout the breeding season. We also performed detailed acoustic analyses comparing male and female song structure. Females sang significantly less often than males, and female and male songs were statistically different for five of eight variables investigated, indicating that the two sexes sing acoustically distinct songs. However, females also sang more often than initially assumed, suggesting that researchers may be missing female song in other species if they are not directly searching for it, particularly in species in which yearling males and females have similar coloration. Therefore, this study highlights the need to re-explore well-studied systems. Further research is needed to determine if and how female song may function in this species.

Résumé

Se piensa que las hembras en las aves de muchas especies de zonas templadas cantan cantos reducidos o mas suaves y aparentemente cantan menos frecuentemente que los machos. Por lo tanto, el canto de las hembras puede ser fácilmente pasado por alto. Cada vez más, los investigadores graban el canto de las hembras en especies muy estudiadas en las que previamente se asumía que las hembras no cantaban o cantaban poco. En este estudio documentamos el uso extensivo del canto de las hembras en Icterus spurius, una especie con maduración tardía del plumaje, donde el canto de las hembras no ha sido bien documentado. Con base en observaciones de las hembras cantando temprano en la temporada de reproducción, hipotetizamos que el canto de las hembras puede utilizarse para la atracción de la pareja. Con el fin de investigar formalmente si las hembras cantan específicamente temprano en la temporada, determinamos las tasas de canto de cada sexo a lo largo de la temporada de reproducción. También realizamos análisis acústicos detallados comparando la estructura del canto de los machos y de las hembras. Las hembras cantaron significativamente menos frecuentemente que los machos y los cantos de las hembras y de los machos fueron significativamente diferentes en cinco de las ocho variables investigadas, indicando que los dos sexos cantan cantos acústicamente diferentes. Sin embargo, las hembras también cantaron más frecuentemente que lo asumido inicialmente, sugiriendo que los investigadores pueden estar pasando por alto el canto de las hembras de otras especies si no lo están buscando directamente, en particular en especies en donde los machos de primer año y las hembras tienen coloraciones similares. Por lo tanto, este estudio resaltamos la necesidad de re-explorar sistemas bien estudiados. Se requiere más investigación para determinar si el canto de las hembras tiene una función y como es esta función.

Key words

acoustic analysis; animal communication; delayed plumage maturation; female song; Icterus spurius; Orchard Oriole

Copyright © 2022 by the author(s). Published here under license by The Resilience Alliance. This article is under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. You may share and adapt the work provided the original author and source are credited, you indicate whether any changes were made, and you include a link to the license.

Journal of Field Ornithology ISSN: 1557-9263